Celebrities use them, athletes use them, and even soccer moms use them. No, we are not speaking of some sort of new running shoes.

We are speaking of personal trainers.

Personal trainers are the secret behind new moms losing their excess baby weight in record time, athletes been able to constantly improve their endurance and celebrities looking great in their slinky cocktail dresses.

If you are thinking about hiring your own personal trainer and do not know where to start, read below to help make the process as painless as possible.

What Makes a Good Personal Trainer?

Some people may say that an elite certification is what makes a good trainer. Others may think that being employed by a prestigious gym is what makes a trainer good. Honestly, a good trainer is the one that will listen to you, devise a personalized workout routine based on your body type, and will push you to meet your goals.

So many trainers out there devise a workout plan that works for one particular body type. Often times that plan is the one the trainer personally follows. However, body types are diverse and there is no one plan or routine that can guarantee results for everyone. A good trainer knows this.

The Benefits of Working with a Good Trainer

Any trainer can help you burn a few extra calories and increase your endurance. However, working with a good trainer can teach you valuable lessons that you can incorporate into your daily life to bring you optimal results.

Instead of telling you to hit the treadmill for 30 minutes, any trainer that is worth their salt will take a look at your specific body type and devise a routine that can help you achieve the body you want in less time than if you are simply performing generic exercises.

They will teach you how to utilize your time not only in the gym, but with any home-based workouts you decide to pursue.

How to Spot a Bad Trainer

Not all bad trainers are easy to spot. Many trainers out there may be enthusiastic to help you achieve your dream body and can even produce results. But, you should beware of trainers who promote one type of workout and are not knowledgeable of any other kinds.

There are so many fad routines out there that trainers adopt that may promise fast results, but really do not have much scientific backing.

Many of these routines incorporate a gimmicky product, such as a Bosu ball. Whereas these items can certainly help your routine, they should not be the main focus. There are also trainers who completely avoid certain equipment, such as free weights or certain pieces of machinery.

This is a red flag that you should not employ this trainer. Good trainers are well-versed in all aspects of physical fitness, and should have routines developed utilizing any and all pieces of gym equipment.


All licensed personal trainers must go through a certification process. The most well-known certifications are administered by American Council on Exercise (ACE), American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM).

Each of these institutions requires their trainers to pass vigorous testing and be able to display a well rounded knowledge base of physical fitness before they are allowed to become certified.

How can you find a trainer?

One of the best ways to find a trainer is to visit several gyms on a trial membership basis and work with a few. Just because your friends like a certain trainer does not mean that they are well trained, or a good fit for you.

There are also several websites that you can use to search for certified trainers in your area:

  • ACSM Certifed Personal Trainer: Trainer Finder
  • ACE Certifed Personal Trainer: Locate a Trainer
  • Ideafit: Find a Personal Trainer

How Much Does a Good Trainer Cost?

Depending on where you live, you can expect to pay $50-$80 per hour, and sometimes more on a personal trainer. Many gyms and trainers offer package discounts if you prepay for several sessions at once.

Many trainers offer classes of only 5 clients or less, which are less expensive than having one all to yourself. However, for their knowledge and expertise, hiring a good personal trainer is priceless.


  • American College of Sports Medicine,
  • American Council on Exercise
  • National Academy of Sports Medicine


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