Fitwirr

30 Day Plank Challenge

Build core strength, improve stability and posture with this 30 Day Plank Challenge. Improving your core strength not only is good for your midsection but also effective at reducing your risk of back injury and making you less susceptible to back pain.

Read Next: 30 Day Ab Challenge

While sit-ups and crunches are great for isolating your rectus abdominals, planking exercises excel at engaging your entire core and abs giving you many more health benefits than standard ab exercises. 

Plank is one of the few abdominal and core exercises that work your entire abs, including your rectus abdominis (a.k.a the six-pack muscles in the front of your stomach), tranversus abdominis, internal obliques and external obliques. Aside from working your abdomen, planking engages the shoulders, glutes and lower back muscles.

Plank Is a Core Stabilization Exercise

Core stabilization training's main objective is to work the deep trunk muscles. Deep trunk muscles help support and protect your lumber spine during dynamic movements like running, lifting objects and twisting. They are essential to everyday functionalities and lack of the strength in these muscles can result in back injuries and back pain. 

Core stabilization exercises such as planks are key components in core strength and stabilization development and the health of your posture and movements. 

This the ultimate goal of this 30 Day Plank Challenge is to work all muscles in your abdominals and strengthen your core to not only improve your look but also everyday performance.

This plank challenge features 6 plank variations covering obliques and abdomen while working stabilization, dynamic movements and core strength. It's really a packed plan for those seeking more than an ab challenge.

30 Day Plank Challenge

30 Day Plank Challenge

How to Complete This 30 Day Plan

Each week, you rotate two planks. This rotation ensures you to hit not only the front abdominal muscle but also sides and deep trunk muscles.

You will advance your planks by increasing either your hold time(or repetitions) or set counts. We encourage that you push yourself to a new height, but we also ask that you move up at your own pace. If you cannot perform a plank properly, take time to learn how to perform it and try again. 

Remember, it's the progress that counts. 

Are you ready for the plank challenge?





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